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Tekken: Blood Feud by Titan Comics is the perfect appetizer for Tekken fans new and old

A review of Titan Comics’ first offering of the Tekken comic series.

It doesn’t happen everyday that you see a Japanese video game coming both in mangas and comic books. In order for this to happen a game’s popularity must be very strong even in western countries. So with the new Tekken comic book series being published by English editor Titan Comics it is an acknowledgement to how much the Tekken franchise is appreciated in Europe and America too.

The very first offering from Tekken: Blood Feud is written with everyone in mind.  To help bring new fans up to speed, some pages are dedicated to providing a small description of the protagonists. As well, every character featured has a small balloon that recaps its profile and background with a short and scratchy tagline. It’s very much similar to how sometimes it is in super-hero comics.

Speaking of super-heroes, the vibe will feel very familiar to fans of such genres. The story is packed with action, fights and many characters like Yoshimitsu, King, Kazuya and his evil alter-ego, share some traits or concepts that make them very enjoyable.

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The pencils are entrusted to Andie Tong, who has worked previously to Spectacular Spiderman and The Batman Strikes! for Marvel and DC Comics. Although his style is sometimes a little raw, especially in drawing faces, the storytelling works good during action scenes and can emphasize some dramatic moments.

The plot is written by Cavan Scott, best-selling author who is responsible for such comic book adaptations like Doctor Who, Star Trek, Adventure Time, Judge Dredd, Warhammer 40,000 and many more.

Tekken: Blood Feud is a four part mini-series that finds its setting being right after Tekken 6. Jin is missing and wanted and even though he is no longer CEO of the Mishima Zaibatsu, he’s still dedicated to destroying some powerful artifacts to avoid his father and grandfather to find and use they for evil purposes.

The destructive feud between the Mishimas seems to be, again, the center of the plot, to serve as a prologue for the final showdown that has been promised in the story mode of Tekken 7. The other fighters, as seen before, find themselves drawn in between, working as allies of both factions.

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The first issue doesn’t engage the plot very much, but serves as a fan appetizer to show the characters for what they’re known and liked for. New audiences will suffer less this repetitiveness, enjoying for the first time the rivalry between Nina and Anna, the strange team formed by a Chinese girl and a fighting panda, and Paul – who is, well, just Paul, the usual badass.

In presenting the famous icons the author does a very good job and the characterization is authentic and respectful of the franchise. However, while taking some time to introduce  heroes and villains to newcomers, Scott doesn’t forget to throw in a detail to enlighten the curiosity. He also touches the ancient civilizations’ theme between Tekken 3 and Tekken 6, leaving some interest for reading the second issue to see how the story further unfolds.

Overall Tekken:Blood Feud Part 1 offers what you would expect to see from a Tekken comic book. Those not at all familiar with the game will become acquainted to the brand easily thanks to the charming characters, and the hardcore players will find a loyal adaptation that makes for a cherished collector’s item.

Tekken: Blood Feud, Issue 1 goes on sale May 3, 2017. Find out how to order.

He’s a long-time Tekken player ever since someone told him, “Hey dude, there’s a new arcade in town,” back in 1995. After working as journalist in Italy for some time, he realized he wrote about everything, but rarely about games. Because he always plays games at “hard” difficulty, the choice to bring the same principle while treating about video games drove him to write in English even though he’s Italian.

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